THIS WEEK’S EVENTS

Events for the week beginning March 25th, 2019 Check out our list of events in the neighborhood this week. Email us at “info at westsiderag dot com” to tell us about any upcoming events or events we’ve missed. Events will be updated every Sunday night with the following week’s schedule. Please double-check times and prices with the event producer. Many venues offer special pricing for students, seniors and members.

 Monday, March 25th

7:30 a.m. until 8:30 a.m. Meditation Gifted meditation instructors lead a session and Q&A in the beautiful Makom space. JCC in Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Avenue. FREE for all;  $5 suggested donation.

1 p.m. until 2 p.m. Organ Demonstration Cathedral organists provide a break for mind, body and spirit on Mondays at 1 pm with an entertaining and informative demonstration of the Cathedral’s unparalleled Great Organ. St. John the Divine, 1047 Amsterdam Avenue (at 112th Street). FREE.

4:30 p.m. until 5:30 p.m. St. Agnes Book Discussion Group: How the Garcia Girls Lost their Accents by Julia Alvarez A clear-eyed look at the insecurity and yearning for a sense of belonging that are a part of the immigrant experience . . . Movingly told.” —The Washington Post Book World Come and join the St. Agnes Book Discussion on the 3rd floor. St. Agnes Library. FREE.

6:30 p.m. An Evening Celebrating Bernard L. Schwartz In celebration of 15 years of transformative support of New-York Historical, join us for an intimate conversation that highlights his fascinating life—from his youth and service during the Second World War to his life’s work in private investment, public policy, philanthropy, and industry. Advance reservations are required to guarantee seating. The Robert H. Smith Auditorium at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West (at 77th St). FREE.

7 p.m. Damon Young’s What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Blacker: A Memoir in Essays For Damon Young, existing while Black is an extreme sport. The act of possessing black skin while searching for space to breathe induces a ceaseless state of angst, where questions like “How should I react here as a professional black person?”, are forever relevant. This memoir explores what it means to be Black (and male) in America today. He will be in conversation with Hannah Giorgis. Book Culture, 536 WEST 112TH ST. FREE.

8 p.m. D’Ambrose Boyd Presents Singers Space Come to Singers Space at Bar Thalia, hosted by D’Ambrose Boyd, where New York’s finest professional and aspiring singers come to sing their favorites and hear their peers perform before an intimate audience. There’s no cover and no minimum. 2537 Broadway at 95th St. FREE.

8 p.m. until 1 a.m. Jam Session & Open Mic Join in the fun at this UWS jazz venue. Cleopatra’s Needle, 2483-2485 Broadway and 92nd Street. No Cover, $10 Minimum. 

Tuesday, March 26th

12 p.m. until 1 p.m. Senior Men’s Discussion Group Join us to discuss events, situations, concerns and other factors that affect our lives today. Also, we revisit our past as it affects our lives today. All discussions are confidential and meetings are casual. Council House on West 72nd Street between Broadway and West End Avenue. No charge to attend to see if you want to continue. If you continue with us Council requests an annual fee of $72.

6 p.m. Passing Down Your Prized Possessions: How to Avoid Fights and Fees In Your Estate The disposition of family treasures—from valuable heirlooms to family photographs—is often overlooked during estate planning, and the sentimental value of such objects often leades to the ugliest family disputes during the estate administration process. With thoughtful planning, you can ensure that those bequests won’t create unintended disharmony, negative tax consequences or financial burdens. Join us for a discussion on effective preparation for the disposition of your tangible personal property and how you can make bequests more meaningful and more memorable.Advance reservations are required to guarantee seating. The Robert H. Smith Auditorium at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West (at 77th St). FREE. 

7 p.m. KK Perez in conversation with Sara Holland and Kass Morgan Lucy Phelps, a young scientist, has a fateful encounter in the Tesla Suite of the New Yorker Hotel that unlocks her dormant electrical powers. As she struggles to understand her new abilities, she is thrust into a battle between rival societies, both sides believing she is the next step in human evolution. But between her enemies and a greatly reduced life expectancy, will Lucy live to find out? Barnes & Noble, 82nd St & Broadway. FREE.

7 p.m. Community Board 7 Health & Human Services Committee 250 West 87th Street (between Broadway & West End Ave)

7 p.m. until 9 p.m. Special Preview: Working Woman Orna, (Liron Ben Shlush) is the mother of three young children with a husband struggling to start his own restaurant. To help support her family Orna returns to the workplace, landing a job with a former army superior, Benny (Menashe Noy) who is now a successful real estate developer. While Orna embraces her new position and tries to balance its demands with her home life, she begins to experience escalating sexual harassment from her boss. Her rapid rise through the ranks and her increasing financial success seem to parallel a pattern of predatory behavior which ultimately brings her career and marital relationship to the brink. This timely and devastating story is expertly told by long time feminist filmmaker Michal Aviad. Hebrew with English subtitles. Screening to be followed by Q+A with the director. JCC Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Ave at 76th Street. $15/$12.

8 p.m. until 9 p.m. Mark Devine Trio 1o p.m. until 1 a.m. Jam Join in the fun at this UWS jazz venue. Cleopatra’s Needle, 2483-2485 Broadway and 92nd Street. No Cover, $10 Minimum. 

8:30 p.m. until 10:30 p.m. Bar Quiz Hosted By Geeks Who Drink Prizes include bar tabs, free drinks, and more… Bar Thalia, 2537 Broadway at 95th St. FREE.

 Wednesday, March 27th

2 p.m. until 3 p.m. Jazz+Wednesdays Join us as jazz guitarist Bill Wurtzel and guests play standards from the American Songbook. Limited seating. American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Sq. FREE.

3 p.m .until 5 p.m. Ten Women of Valor The NCJW NY Eleanor Leff Jewish Women’s Resource Center Steering Committee welcomes author Anne Hosansky and invites you to become reacquainted with ten biblical heroines through her book, Ten Women of Valor. In dramatic monologues, the women reveal how they managed to triumph in a male-dominated world. Ranging from indomitable Sarah to legendary Esther, they confide frank feelings of faith, ambition, passion, and sibling rivalry. They emerge as women coping with many of the same issues women face today. RSVP is recommended. Light refreshments will be served. Nat’l Council of Jewish Women NY, 241 W. 72nd Street. FREE.

5:45 p.m. until 6:45 p.m. Meditation Gifted meditation instructors lead a session and Q&A in the beautiful Makom space. JCC in Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Avenue. FREE for all;  $5 suggested donation.

6 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. The W Connection Widows Helping Widows Rebuild Their Lives UWS Chapter Meeting Join us to discuss topics and issues to help widows rebuild their lives after the loss of a spouse.  These groups are for widows and run by widows.  Please RSVP to dawn@wconnection.org if you are interested in attending a complimentary trial meeting on UWS.  If you would like to join after your trial meeting, membership in The W Connection is $40 annually which gives you access to all our chapter and programs.

6 p.m. Sonatenabend Pianists from Juilliard’s Collaborative Piano department perform sonata repertoire in partnership with student instrumentalists. Paul Recital Hall. FREE.

6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Art Inspired By… Jennifer Baird Create your own masterpiece inspired by work from famous artists using various art techniques. The series will include an overview of the artist or technique, followed by a hands-on workshop. RSVP required: Contact Lakira Marshall at (212) 397-3159 or lakira.marshall@parks.nyc.gov for more information regarding accessibility. Gertrude Ederle Recreation Center, 232 W. 60th St. FREE.

6:30 p.m. The Woman Suffrage Movement and the Continuing Fight for Women’s Equality – This event is sold out. What can the present-day women’s movement learn from the 19th- and early 20th-century battle for the vote? Join Marjorie Spruill, historian of woman suffrage, and Judaline Cassidy, tradeswoman activist, in conversation with Lynn Sherr, award-winning broadcaster and author, as they consider the long journey towards full equality. The Skylight Gallery at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West (at 77th St). $15; FREE for Members of the Women’s History Council.

6:30 p.m. until 8 p.m. Artist Perspectives: Contemporary Jewelry and Ancient Technique Artist Perspectives: Contemporary Jewelry and Ancient Technique is a conversation featuring jewelry designer emiko oye; Nicole Jacquard, associate professor and head of the Jewelry, Metalsmithing program at Indiana University; Anya Kivarkis, artist, associate professor and area head of Jewelry and Metalsmithing at the University of Oregon; and Sasha Nixon, curator of A View from the Jeweler’s Bench: Ancient Treasures, Contemporary Statements. 18 West 86th Street, Gallery (between CPW & Columbus). Adults $8; Seniors/Students $5.

7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. Ambassador Dan Shapiro on the State of the Two-State Solution Dan Shapiro, former U.S. Ambassador to Israel under President Obama is joined by Tablet Magazine’s Yair Rosenberg for a probing discussion of just how likely a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict now is—and what some of the alternatives might be. Congregation Rodeph Sholom, 7 West 83rd Street off CPW. CRS members free, non-members $10.

7 p.m. 112: Lawrence Kramer on The Hum of the World The Hum of the World is an invitation to contemplate what would happen if we heard the world as attentively as we see it. Balancing big ideas with playful wit and lyrical prose, this imaginative volume identifies the role of sound in Western experience as the primary medium in which the presence and persistence of life acquire tangible form. Book Culture, 536 WEST 112TH ST. FREE.

7 p.m. until 11 p.m. Open Mic Night Join in the fun at this UWS jazz venue. With Les Kurtz Trio. Cleopatra’s Needle, 2483-2485 Broadway and 92nd Street. No Cover, $10 Minimum. 

7:30 p.m. Women at the Crossroads with Caytha Jentis and other women artists In the “Moth-style” format, women of all ages and colors tell their personal stories, in ten minute monologues, of life, laughter, love, and everything in between. Advent Lutheran Church, 2504 Broadway (at 93rd). $15-$20.

Thursday, March 28th

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tucker Greenmarket Local farmers sell a wide range of items including: seasonal vegetables, berries, stone fruit, over 80 varieties of apples, farmstead cheeses, fresh seafood, grass fed beef, duck, eggs, baked goods and New York’s only sorghum and maple syrup. West 66th Street and Columbus Avenue.

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Columbia Greenmarket Shoppers will find milk and yogurt, fruit and cider, baked goods, preserved fruits and vegetables, eggs, cheese, smoked meats, pickled vegetables, maple syrup, honey, fish, and focaccia topped with locally sourced fruit vegetables, herbs and cheeses, a lunch time favorite. Located in front of the gates of Columbia University; Broadway between 114th and 116th Streets.

1 p.m. until 2 p.m. Curator’s Perspective Tour Join us for a tour of the exhibition Made in New York City: The Business of Folk Art with curator Elizabeth V. Warren. American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Sq. FREE.

2 p.m. until 3:30 p.m. Central Park Tour: Heart of the Park Walk straight through the heart of Central Park on this east-to-west tour led by Central Park Conservancy Guides. Enjoy a great variety of the scenic, sculptural, and architectural elements the Park has to offer. Highlights of this tour include Conservatory Water, Loeb Boathouse, Bethesda Terrace, Bow Bridge, Cherry Hill, the Lake, and Strawberry Fields. Meet: Samuel F. B. Morse statue (inside the Park at 72nd Street and Fifth Avenue). Tour ends at 72nd Street and Central Park West. FREE.

5:30 p.m. until 6:45 p.m. NY Writers Coalition Please join us for writing and sharing work in a supportive and respectful environment. Writers of all genres and levels of experience welcome. No prior writing experience is necessary. Led by Elizabeth Leonard, writer and writing workshop leader certified to lead creative writing workshops with NY Writers Coalition. Limited to 25 participants, adults 18+. St. Agnes Library. FREE.

5:45 p.m. Bloomingdale Book Discussion This month’s selection is Listen to the Marriage by John Osborn. Please come prepared! St. Agnes Library, The Pasculano Foundation Adult Learning Center. FREE.

6 p.m. until 9 p.m. Programs Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), 2 Columbus Circle (between Broadway & 8th Ave). Pay-What-You-Wish.

2 p.m. Tetsuo II: Body Hammer (Dir. Shinya Tsukamoto, 1992) “I don’t know what I am,” cries a Japanese salaryman, whose rage at his son’s kidnapping by violent thugs transforms his body into a living machine. In the big-budget follow-up to his cult classic Tetsuo: The Iron Man, Shinya Tsukamoto continues his surrealist exploration of the blurring of technology and the human body in a postindustrial world. Hailed as a strikingly original masterpiece, Tetsuo II: Body Hammer uses subversive and hallucinatory imagery to vividly capture the waves of technological fear coursing throughout Japanese science fiction in the second half of the twentieth century. 82 min. With Tomorowo Taguchi and Shinya Tsukamoto. In Japanese, with English subtitles. Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), 2 Columbus Circle (between Broadway & 8th Ave). $10 general / $5 members and students.

7 p.m. 112th: The Scar by Mary Cregan Perceptive, intimate, and elegantly written, The Scar vividly depicts the pain and ongoing stigma of clinical depression, giving greater insight into its management and offering hope for those who are suffering. Book Culture, 536 WEST 112TH ST. FREE.

7:30 p.m. Hamid Al-Saadi with Safaafir: The Maqam of Iraq Experience traditional Iraqi maqam with Hamid Al-Saadi, one of the genre’s greatest living masters. Al-Saadi, committed to sharing the arts and culture of the Arab world, travels extensively as a maqam scholar, singer, artist, and writer. Joining him is Safaafir, the only U.S.-based ensemble dedicated to performing the centuries-old musical tradition, led by two American-born siblings of Iraqi descent: Dena ElSaffar, who holds a degree in classical viola performance from Indiana University, and Amir ElSaffar, a jazz trumpeter and composer based in New York City. In addition to presenting maqam in its traditional format, this special engagement in the Atrium will incorporate jazz, classical, and other Middle Eastern styles to create a highly unique and personalized sound. David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. FREE.

7:30 p.m. MSM Afro-Cuban Jazz Orchestra Directed by Arturo O’Farrill An evening of infectious afro-cuban jazz rhythms celebrating the musical tradition and lineage of the O’Farrill family, with compositions by Arturo, his father Chico, and his son Adam. Neidorff-Karpati Hall, 130 Claremont Ave., (just north of W. 122nd St). FREE.

Friday, March 29th

8 a.m. until 2 p.m. 97th Street Greenmarket This year-round market features produce from southern New Jersey, Orange County, NY, and the Hudson Valley, as well as eggs, grass-fed meat, fish, cheese, and more. 97th St between Columbus & Amsterdam. FREE.

12:30 p.m. until 1:30 p.m. Stay Well Exercise Join us for a free Stay Well exercise session. Stay well Volunteers certified by the NYC’s Department For the Aging will lead participants in a well -balanced series of exercises for seniors of all ability levels. Please wear loose comfortable clothing. Exercise equipment will be provided . All participants are required to sign a personal medical waiver at the beginning of the class. St. Agnes Library. FREE.

5:30 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. Free Music Fridays Music featured at the Free Music Fridays series thematically reflects the spirit of the self-taught art on view at the museum. Tonight’s performance: Lucas Rotman (Acoustic Folk/Americana); 6:05 pm: Thea Hopkins (Poetic, modern Americana); 6:40 pm: Mercy Bell (Technicolor folk for the 21st century). American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Sq. FREE.

6:30 p.m. Ladies’ Garments, Women’s Work, Women’s Activism: Garment Work and Women’s Organizing in New York City This event is sold out. The International Ladies’ Garment Workers Union (ILGWU) was once the largest union of women in the world, with tens of thousands of members in New York City alone. Generations of women workers and organizers in New York fought for recognition and protection for workers on the job, and reimagined what unions could do beyond the factories. The ILGWU pioneered modern worker benefits and inspired social welfare programs in education, health, recreation, and legal aid. Its women organizers also shaped women’s movements across the 20th century, using their experience and resources to energize campaigns for women’s rights from the suffrage movement of the 1910s to the fight for the Equal Rights Amendment in the 1970s. Skylight Gallery, New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West (at 77th St). $15 (Members $12); FREE for Members of the Women’s History Council.

7 p.m. “Celebrating Joan Tower!” Part of the Bloomingdale School of Music’s celebration of Women’s History Month — regarded as one of the most important American composers living today, Joan Tower will join BSM faculty members Claudia Schaer, Gili Sharett and Marc Peloquin in a celebration of her music. FREE. David Greer Recital Hall, 323 West 108th St. FREE.

7:30 p.m. Manhattan School of Music Composers’ Orchestra Conducted by George Manahan (BM ’73, MM ’76), this concert features new works for orchestra by student composers. Neidorff-Karpati Hall, 130 Claremont Ave., (just north of W. 122nd St). FREE.

7 p.m. NYC Teen Author Festival Reader’s Theater YA lovers one and all, please join us for Reader’s Theater and a signing as part of the NYC Teen Author Festival! A lineup of YA authors will share and perform each other’s work, and sign your books! Our lineup this year includes Kheryn Callendar, Katie Cicatelli-Kuc, Sarah Beth Durst, Sarah Enni, Jessica Khoury, David Levithan, Torrey Maldonado, and Andrew Simonet. Barnes & Noble, 82nd St & Broadway. FREE.

7:30 p.m. 20th Precinct, Housing (Upper West Side) Build the Block Neighborhood Policing & Safety Meeting The NYPD’s Neighborhood Coordination Officers (NCOs) and Steady Sector Officers collaborate directly with residents in identifying and solving local quality of life and crime concerns. These officers are assigned to our community each day, so they can learn our neighborhood and the people who call it home. The NCOs for the 20th Precinct, Housing, are PO Steven Rodriguez and PO Donald Capak. Please join us for what we hope will be a lively and productive conversation. For accessibility accommodations, please call (212) 580-6448. Watch live on FacebookAmsterdam Tenant Association, 218 W. 64th Street.

 Saturday, March 30th

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tucker Greenmarket Local farmers sell a wide range of items including: seasonal vegetables, berries, stone fruit, over 80 varieties of apples, farmstead cheeses, fresh seafood, grass fed beef, duck, eggs, baked goods and New York’s only sorghum and maple syrup. West 66th Street and Columbus Avenue.

9 a.m. until 10 a.m. NYRR Open Run: Morningside Park Open Run is a community-based, volunteer-led running initiative bringing free weekly runs and walks to local neighborhood parks, across all five boroughs of NYC. The courses vary based on the park, but the courses are between 2.5 and 3 miles long. Participants are encouraged to arrive 15 minutes before the start of the run and to leave their valuables at home – bag check is not provided. No need to do anything before the run, just show up. Open to all ages, experience levels, walkers, strollers, dogs: All are welcome! 110th Street & Manhattan Avenue, Morningside Park. FREE.

9 a.m. until 5 p.m. Morningside Park’s Down to Earth Farmer’s Market Local farmers sell a wide range of items including: seasonal vegetables, fruits, plants and flowers, baked goods, fresh fish and seafood, beef, poultry, eggs, cheese, yogurt, honey, pickles and pantry staples such as cornmeal polenta, wheat flour, roasted nuts and dried pasta. Corner of 110th St. & Manhattan Ave.

10 a.m. until 3 p.m. She’s On Point! Celebrating Women in Sports: Find the She-Ro in You Come join us in celebration of National Girls and Women in Sports in observance of Title IX and Women’s History Month! We will help find the She-Ro that lives in you. Beginning with a 2K run to warm up, the day will follow with a variety of sports and fitness activities. Don’t forget your swimsuit! Gertrude Ederle Recreation Center, 232 W. 60th St. FREE.

11 a.m. We Are the Gardeners Storytime From Joanna Gaines, this new children’s book chronicles the adventures of starting a family garden. Trying something new isn’t always easy, but the hardest work often yields the greatest reward. Barnes & Noble, 82nd St & Broadway. FREE.

11 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. Central Park Discovery Walks: The North Woods The North Woods is the largest of the Park’s woodlands, offering a 40-acre forest retreat in the middle of New York City. Learn about the design of this serene landscape and how the plants and trees contribute to the health of an urban woodland community. Discovery Walks for Families are a great way for parents and children of all ages to learn about the nature and history of Central Park in fun and creative ways. Highlights: Charles A. Dana Discovery Center, Harlem Meer, Huddlestone Arch, and The Loch. Terrain: A few inclines, some stairs, and wood-chipped trails; may not be suitable for strollers. Space is limited, registration required. Families with children ages 5+ only; no groups, please. Please arrive 15 minutes before the start of the Discovery Walk to allow time for check in. Meet: Charles A. Dana Discovery Center (inside the Park at 110th Street between Fifth and Lenox Avenues). FREE.

1 p.m. until 2 p.m. Families and Folk Art: New York City—Then and Now In the galleries, families will explore the landscape of nineteenth century New York City. Nearly unrecognizable to New Yorkers now, farmland dominated many of the boroughs until 1898, when the separate cities of Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, and Staten Island joined Manhattan to make up what we now know as New York City. Through a guided tour, participants will consider how our city has evolved over the past 200 years and create an artwork that reflects their own borough: then and now.

2 p.m. Cinema | Ghost in the Shell (Dir. Mamoru Oshii, 1996, 82 min) A landmark of both Japanese animation and cinematic science fiction, Ghost in the Shell helped bring Japanese anime to global audiences. Based on the manga of the same name by Masamune Shirow, Ghost in the Shell employs cutting-edge animation and visual style to examine the effects of computers on what it means to be human. It is set in 2029, when advanced technology allows for the human body to be augmented or wholesale replaced by cybernetic parts, such that human consciousness becomes a “ghost” in the “machine” of the body. In this future, a militant public security agent, Motoko Kusanagi, hunts a mysterious hacker known as the Puppet Master, who holds secrets of her past and possible future. With Atsuko Tanaka, Akio Ōtsuka, and Iemasa Kayumi. In Japanese, with English subtitles. Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), 2 Columbus Circle (between Broadway & 8th Ave). $10 general; $5 members and students.

2 p.m. Saturday Afternoon Movie: The Spy Who Dumped Me The Spy Who Dumped Me (2018, R, 116 min) When a woman discovers her ex is a spy, she and her friend are thrown into the world of espionage. Starring: Mila Kunis, Kate McKinnon. Dir: Susanna Fogel. St. Agnes Library. FREE.

2 p.m. until 3 p.m. Closer-Look Tour A tour of Made in New York City: The Business of Folk Art, led by museum gallery guides. Meet in the museum atrium.

 Sunday, March 31st

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Columbia Greenmarket Shoppers will find milk and yogurt, fruit and cider, baked goods, preserved fruits and vegetables, eggs, cheese, smoked meats, pickled vegetables, maple syrup, honey, fish, and focaccia topped with locally sourced fruit vegetables, herbs and cheeses, a lunch time favorite. Located in front of the gates of Columbia University; Broadway between 114th and 116th Streets.

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. 77th Street Greenmarket Located on beautiful, tree-lined Columbus Avenue, this year-round market stretches from 77th St. each Sunday. Just behind the American Museum of Natural History, shoppers will find grass-fed beef, goat cheese, fresh flowers, eggs, honey, baked goods, apple cider, and a large variety of fruit and vegetables. Columbus Avenue at 77th St (NE corner).

10 a.m. until 4 p.m. E-Waste Recycle Day PLEASE DROP-OFF: Working & non-working computers, monitors, printers/scanners, keyboards, mice,cables, TVs, VCRs & DVD players, phones, audio/visual equipment, cell phones & PDA’s. For more information, please call (212) 477-4022. JCC at 76th Street and Amsterdam Avenue.

10 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. Grand Bazaar Indoors & outdoors, local artist, designers, and antique/vintage dealers sell one-of-a-kind and limited edition art, antique watches, vintage collectibles and fashion, handmade jewelry and furniture. Delicious artisianal edibles will unsure that you will never leave hungry. 100 West 77th St. (at Columbus Avenue). FREE admission.

11 a.m. Sunday Platform – Jason Haber: Robert Moses, Jane Jacobs, and the Battle for New York Jane Jacobs called it a ballet. It was a soaring, stimulating, and safe place. Neighborhoods had density. Buildings had character. Streets had eyes. By the 1960’s, urban planning had changed. Led by Robert Moses, the ballet of the City would come to a grinding halt. It was replaced by the superblock, the highrise and the highway. The wrecking ball sealed the fate of neighborhoods. What implications did this have on life in New York and how do those fateful decisions still impact us today? New York Society for Ethical Culture, 2 West 64th Street (at Central Park West). FREE.

3 p.m. until 5 p.m. Cesar Chavez Day – Justice for Farmworkers In honor of Cesar Chavez Day, an afternoon of spirit, song and social justice in support of New York’s 80,000 farmworkers who remain excluded from the basic labor protections entitled to all other workers. The event will feature New York’s own Latin Grammy winning recording artists Flor de Toloache! B’nai Jeshurun, 257 West 88th St. (between Broadway and West End Ave.). FREE.

3 p.m. 112th: Body Politic Book Club Body Politic is a feminist collective based in New York that hosts workshops, panels, and meetups around issues of race, gender, and sexuality in the wellness community. This month we’re reading Freshwater by Akwaeki Emezi, a novel about shapeshifting, Igbo spirits, non-binary identity and much more. Anyone is welcome to attend whether or not they’ve read the book. Book Culture, 536 WEST 112TH ST. FREE.

4 p.m. until 4:45 p.m. Choral Evensong Choral evening prayer in the tradition of the great Cathedrals of the Anglican Communion. Preces and Responses, Anthems, and Canticles sung by the renowned Cathedral Choir. St. John the Divine, 1047 Amsterdam Avenue (at 112th Street). FREE.

4:45 p.m. until 5:45 p.m. It’s Sunday: Phoon Yu In celebration of our magnificent Great Organ, the Cathedral presents a concert series following Sunday Evensong, featuring guest recitalists from around the country. St. John the Divine, 1047 Amsterdam Avenue (at 112th Street). FREE.

4 p.m. until 8 p.m. Open Mic Night Join in the fun at this UWS jazz venue. With Keith Ingham. Cleopatra’s Needle, 2483-2485 Broadway and 92nd Street. No Cover, $10 Minimum.