THIS WEEK’S EVENTS

Events for the week beginning April 16th, 2018 Check out our list of events in the neighborhood this week. Email us at “info at westsiderag dot com” to tell us about any upcoming events or events we’ve missed. Events will be updated every Sunday night with the following week’s schedule. Please double-check times and prices with the event producer. Many venues offer special pricing for students, seniors and members.

 Monday, April 16th

11 a.m. Young Music Makers 2018 Each spring for more than two decades, schools from throughout the US present their bands, jazz ensembles, choirs, choruses and orchestras on Lincoln Center’s outdoor plazas as part of Lincoln Center’s Young Music Makers series. Josie Robertson Plaza. FREE.

1 p.m .until 1:30 p.m. Great Organ: Midday Monday Cathedral organists provide a 30-minute break for mind, body and spirit on Mondays at 1 pm with an entertaining and informative demonstration of the Cathedral’s unparalleled Great Organ. The Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine, 1047 Amsterdam Avenue (at 112th Street). FREE.

1:15 p.m. until 2:15 p.m. Looking at Lionesses: Macedonian Courts and Jewelry in the Fourth and Third Centuries BCE Lion-head earrings and necklaces became popular in Macedonia in the late fourth century and developed into popular ornament types found throughout the Hellenistic world. This powerful imagery is unusual for women’s jewelry at this time, but lions are popular in contemporary masculine material culture. In this talk Alexis Q. Castor will explore issues concerning elite status and gender roles in a period during which the Macedonian court saw tremendous changes in its local and global identity. Bard Graduate Center, 38 West 86th Street (between CPW & Columbus), Lecture Hall. FREE.

7 p.m. 112th: Peter Szendy on Of Stigmatology: Punctuation as Experience Join us for a discussion of Peter Szendy’s Of Stigmatology: Punctuation as Experience (Verbal Arts: Studies in Poetics) at Book Culture on 112th. Peter will be joined in conversation with Adam Shatz, contributing editor at the London Review of Books. Of Stigmatology elaborates for the first time a general theory of punctuation. Beginning with punctuation marks in the common sense, Peter Szendy goes on to trace the effects of punctuation more broadly, arguing that looking and hearing are not passive acts of reception, but themselves punctuate the images and sounds they take in. Szendy reads an astonishing range of texts and traditions, from medical auscultation to literature (Chekhov, Sterne, Kafka), philosophy (Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Derrida), psychoanalysis (Lacan), and film (Raging Bull, The Trial, Fight Club). Book Culture, 536 WEST 112TH ST. FREE.

7 p.m. Community Board 7: Parks and Environment Committee CB7 Office, 250 West 87th Street

8 p.m. until 1 a.m. Jam Session & Open Mic Join in the fun at this UWS jazz venue. Cleopatra’s Needle, 2483-2485 Broadway and 92nd Street. No Cover, $10 Minimum. 

Tuesday, April 17th

7:30 a.m. until 8:30 a.m. Meditation Gifted meditation instructors lead a session and Q&A in the beautiful Makom space. JCC in Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Avenue. FREE for all;  $5 suggested donation.

9 a.m. CEC3 Middle School Committee Meeting District 3 public school parents, please join the conversation about changes to the middle school admissions process for all students from the current fourth grade down. Admissions for the September 2019 school year are being discussed now and we want to hear your ideas. Joan of Arc, rm 204, 154 W 94th Street.

5:30 p.m. until 7 p.m. The First Emperor, the Chinese Empire, and the Wider World: Art and Material Culture of the Qin Dynasty By examining the art and material culture recovered through archaeology in the last fifty years, this presentation focuses on the First Emperor of China and the Empire that he created during the late third century BC. It also explores the contact between China and other parts of the world, which resulted from the increased trade and exchange over the transcontinental Silk Road and through maritime routes across the oceans. Bard Graduate Center, 38 West 86th Street, Lecture Hall (between CPW & Columbus). FREE.

6:30 p.m. Community Board 7: Steering Committee CB7 Office, 250 West 87th Street

7 p.m. 112th: Leah Umansky reads from The Barbarous Century The Barbarous Century is a journey through the stories that inform us and the stories we tell ourselves. Confessional, without being confessional, and with compelling wordplay and lyricism, Umansky illustrates the many challenges we all face in being human: how to be good in a world gone wrong. It uses varied dystopias embedded in myth, story, technology and popular culture to highlight the struggle of being a woman in the 21st century. With longing, resentment, humor and desire, these intriguing poems highlight the want for an easier and gentler way to navigate this world we call ours. Book Culture, 536 WEST 112TH ST. FREE.

 7 p.m. Columbus: Galen Strawson on Things That Bother Me An original collection of lauded philosopher Galen Strawson’s writings on the self and consciousness, naturalism and pan-psychism. Book Culture, 450 COLUMBUS AVE. FREE.

7 p.m. William Ayers’ “You Can’t Fire the Bad Ones!”: And 18 Other Myths about Teachers, Teachers Unions, and Public Education Author and activist William Ayers flips the script on many enduring myths about teachers, teachers’ unions, and education that permeate our culture. By unpacking these myths, and underscoring the necessity of strong and vital public schools as a common good, he challenges readers–whether parents, community members, policy makers, activists, or educators themselves–to rethink their assumptions. Barnes & Noble, 82nd & Broadway. FREE.

8 p.m. Loud Laughs Comedy at Whispers Join us for a comedy show featuring Jared Fried: MTV, Comedy Cellar / Ruperto Vanderpool:, Gotham AXS TV / Laura Bolivar: Broadway Comedy Club / Melvin Washington Jr: Las Vegas Comedy Festival. Whispers Restaurant 210 West 94th Street (at Broadway). FREE.

 Wednesday, April 18th

11 a.m. Young Music Makers 2018 Each spring for more than two decades, schools from throughout the US present their bands, jazz ensembles, choirs, choruses and orchestras on Lincoln Center’s outdoor plazas as part of Lincoln Center’s Young Music Makers series. Josie Robertson Plaza. FREE.

1 p.m. until 2 p.m. Mid-Day Music at Columbia Concert featuring Thomas Nielsen on piano. Come join us in the Garden Room, where Students and Music Associates from Columbia University’s Music Performance Program will be showcased in an afternoon recital series. 64 Morningside Dr. FREE.

2 p.m. until 3 p.m. Jazz+Wednesdays Each Wednesday, from 2 to 3 pm, the Bill Wurtzel Trio play standards from the American Songbook. American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square (Columbus Avenue between 65th and 66th Streets). FREE.

6 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. The W Connection Widows Helping Widows Rebuild Their Lives UWS Chapter Meeting Join us to discuss topics and issues to help widows rebuild their lives after the loss of a spouse.  These groups are for widows and run by widows.  Please RSVP to dawn@wconnection.org if you are interested in attending a complimentary trial meeting on UWS.  If you would like to join after your trial meeting, membership in The W Connection is $40 annually which gives you access to all our chapter and programs.

6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Indigenous Ontologies of Active Matter The Indigenous ontologies working group considers the fact that diverse peoples of the world bring their own cultural values and orientations to the material realm: their own fundamental notions of what “the object” is and isn’t; what its proper and persistent relationships to humans and other-than-human beings might be; what protocols surround its conservation, if indeed it ought to be preserved at all. Thinking globally, we explore cases where Indigenous ontologies of “Active Matter” expand western scientific, aesthetic and philosophical paradigms around the collection, care, and exhibition of living cultural heritage—tangible and otherwise. This event will include three short presentations followed by a moderated conversation. Bard Graduate Center, 38 West 86th Street, Lecture Hall (between CPW & Columbus). FREE.

7 p.m. 112th: The Rest of It with Martin Duberman For many, the death of a parent marks a low point in their personal lives. For Martin Duberman–a major historian and a founding figure in the history of gay and lesbian studies–the death of his mother was just the beginning of what became a twelve-year period filled with despair, drug addiction, and debauchery. From his cocaine use, massive heart attack, and immersion into New York’s gay hustler scene to experiencing near-suicidal depression and attending rehab, The Rest of It is the previously untold and revealing story of how Duberman managed to survive his turbulent personal life while still playing leading roles in the gay community and the academy. Book Culture, 536 WEST 112TH ST. FREE.

7 p.m. 24th Precinct Community Council 151 West 100th Street (between Columbus & Amsterdam)

7 p.m. Community Board 7: Land Use Committee CB7 Office, 250 West 87th Street

7 p.m. until 11 p.m. Open Mic Night Join in the fun at this UWS jazz venue. With Les Kurtz Trio. Cleopatra’s Needle, 2483-2485 Broadway and 92nd Street. No Cover, $10 Minimum. 

Thursday, April 19th

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tucker Greenmarket Local farmers sell a wide range of items including: seasonal vegetables, berries, stone fruit, over 80 varieties of apples, farmstead cheeses, fresh seafood, grass fed beef, duck, eggs, baked goods and New York’s only sorghum and maple syrup. West 66th Street and Columbus Avenue.

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Columbia Greenmarket Shoppers will find milk and yogurt, fruit and cider, baked goods, preserved fruits and vegetables, eggs, cheese, smoked meats, pickled vegetables, maple syrup, honey, fish, and focaccia topped with locally sourced fruit vegetables, herbs and cheeses, a lunch time favorite. Located in front of the gates of Columbia University; Broadway between 114th and 116th Streets.

1 p.m. until 2 p.m. Closer-Look Tour A tour of Vestiges & Verse: Notes from the Newfangled Epic, led by museum gallery guides. American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square (Columbus Avenue between 65th and 66th Streets). FREE.

5 p.m. until 6:30 p.m. Cookbook Club You are cordially invited to our Cookbook Club where we will swap favorite recipes obtained from cookbooks, from grandma or family traditions and from the media. There will be a theme for each month. April is 5 Ingredients Dinner Month. St. Agnes Library. FREE.

5:45 p.m. until 6:45 p.m. Meditation Gifted meditation instructors lead a session and Q&A in the beautiful Makom space. JCC in Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Avenue. FREE for all;  $5 suggested donation.

6 p.m. until 9 p.m. Events at MAD Museum of Arts and Design (MAD), 2 Columbus Circle (between Broadway & 8th Ave). Pay-what-you-wish.

6:30 p.m. Madame Jumel Collects: the pioneering art collection of New Yorker Eliza Jumel Art historian Margaret Oppenheimer, author of The Remarkable Rise of Eliza Jumel: A Story of Marriage and Money in the Early Republic, will discuss Mme. Jumel’s art collection–over 240 paintings acquired in Paris at the beginning of the 19th century. The amazing Jumel–raised in a brothel, indentured as a servant, and confined to a workhouse while her mother was in jail–rose to become one of the richest women in New York. Along the way, she turned herself into an art connoisseur, acquiring more than 240 paintings while living in Paris between 1815 and 1817. Oppenheimer will bring Jumel’s pioneering collection back to life, discussing the paintings, their owner, and the early nineteenth-century art scene in New York and Paris. Hostelling International NYC, 891 Amsterdam Avenue (at 103rd Street). FREE.

7 p.m. 112th: Hassan Najmi on The Blueness of the Evening This selection of Hassan Najmi’s poems, translated by Mbarek Sryfi and Eric Sellin, provides an excellent introduction to the work of one of Morocco’s foremost poets and to a school of modern verse emerging in the Arab World. Scenes of late night cityscapes, lonely interiors, awe-inspiring desert wastes, and seaside vistas are found within the exquisitely subtle lyric moods and nuances of Najmi’s ars poetica, providing insight into the geographical, political, and linguistic ferment that have made Morocco an exciting hub of creative activity in the twenty-first century. Book Culture, 536 WEST 112TH ST. FREE.

7 p.m. Charles Kaiser in Conversation With Clara Bingham Charles Kaiser’s 1968 in America is widely recognized as one of the best historic accounts of the 1960s. Largely based on unpublished interviews and documents, this is compulsively readable popular history. Now, it is even more clear that this was a uniquely terrible, wonderful, and pivotal year in the story of America. Barnes & Noble, 82nd & Broadway. FREE.

7:30 p.m. Julliard Organists’ Recital This annual recital features eight students of Grammy Award-winning organist Paul Jacobs. The young musicians, some of the brightest stars among the next generation of organists, will perform a wide variety of music showcasing the organ as a solo instrument. The Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine, 1047 Amsterdam Avenue (at 112th Street). FREE.

7:30 p.m. Suite for Abu Sadiya featuring Yacine Boulares, Vincent Segal & Nasheet Waits In this musical take on a North African myth, Brooklyn-based, French-Tunisian saxophonist Yacine Boulares, French cellist Vincent Segal, and American drummer Nasheet Waits reimagine the forgotten Stambeli tradition—a healing trance music created by the descendants of sub-Saharan slaves brought to Tunisia. Boulares and Segal’s original compositions form a series of variations on the legend of the hunter Abu Sadiya. In his wandering search for his enslaved daughter, Abu Sadiya danced and sang his sorrow in the streets of Tunis, thus becoming the first musician of Stambeli and personifying the memory of sub-Saharan slaves in Tunisia. David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. FREE.

Friday, April 20th

8 a.m. until 2 p.m. 97th Street Greenmarket This year-round market features produce from southern New Jersey, Orange County, NY, and the Hudson Valley, as well as eggs, grass-fed meat, fish, cheese, and more. 97th St between Columbus & Amsterdam. FREE.

10 am; 1 pm; 2pm; 3pm Young Music Makers 2018 Each spring for more than two decades, schools from throughout the US present their bands, jazz ensembles, choirs, choruses and orchestras on Lincoln Center’s outdoor plazas as part of Lincoln Center’s Young Music Makers series. Josie Robertson Plaza. FREE.

1 p.m. until 2 p.m. Clothes Make the Country American art historian, Rena Tobey, will lead a discussion on fresh ways to consider the formation of a nation through closely viewing the clothing and accessories in a few American colonial portraits. These fascinating details provide important clues into the values, aspirations, and daily lives of men, women, and children in the 18th century. The Wellness Program at DOROT is for older adults ages 60+; To Pre-Register, please call Shannon O’Connor at 917-441-3743 or email at soconnor@dorotusa.org. DOROT, 171 W. 85th Street. $5.

5:30 p.m. Free Music Fridays Music featured at the Free Music Fridays series thematically reflects the spirit of the self-taught art on view at the museum. Performances by: Miwa Gemini (Indie folk/pop); 6:05 pm: Laura Rebel Angel (Rockabilly twang); 6:40 pm: Melissa Czarnik (Hip-hop folk). American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square (Columbus Avenue between 65th and 66th Streets). FREE.

6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Girls Write Now, Chapter Reading Series The CHAPTERS Reading Series showcases today’s new voices. Featuring: Kayleen Schaefer is a New York-based journalist and author of the bestselling Kindle Single memoir Fade Out. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Vanity Fair, New Yorker, and Vogue, among others. Her first book, Text Me When You Get Home: The Evolution and Triumph of Modern Female Friendship, was published by Penguin Random House this year. The New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street). Pay-as-you-wish.

7 p.m. Bernard and Irene Schwartz Classic Film Series: Marius (1931) Join us for the New-York Historical Society’s film series, featuring opening remarks by notable filmmakers, writers, legal scholars, and historians. Explore how film has tackled social strife, morality, and the perennial struggle between right and wrong—conflicts that manifest across cultures and history. Featured film: Marius (1931). In this French romantic classic about love and adventure on the shores of Marseilles, a man is forced to choose between fulfilling his life’s passion and marrying the woman he loves. (French with English subtitles.) Directed by Alexander Korda. Starring Raimu, Pierre Fresnay, Orane Demazis. 127 min. The New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street). Pay-as-you-wish.

7 p.m. 112th: The Upstairs Play Series Presents Rents and Catcall Katherine Burns’ play Rents explores the question of what children owe their parents, and what parents owe their children. We’ll also be starting off the evening with a shorter dramatic reading of an Ugly Duckling Presse chapbook, Catcall by Holly Melgard in order to connect and inform our main play, as both pieces deal with the idea of ownership over another person and body. Book Culture, 536 WEST 112TH ST. FREE.

7 p.m. until 9:30 p.m. Music Café: David Bennett Cohen and Michael Rorby Join us to unwind, relax, enjoy the music, refreshments, good company, and entertainment. Trombonist and singer Michael Rorby and piano player David Bennett Cohen headline, performing separately and then playing some New Orleans jazz together. Celebrate the different spin backed with our stellar John Wilmeth Jazz Trio. New York Society for Ethical Culture, 2 West 64th Street (at Central Park West). Members $10, Nonmembers $15, includes snacks and a beverage (wine, beer, soda).

7:30 p.m. ¡VAYA! 63: Eddie Montalvo y su Orquesta Bronx-born conguero Eddie Montalvo started keeping time when he was just five years old, eventually backing superstars Celia Cruz, Héctor Lavoe, Willie Colón, and Johnny Pacheco, and in 1979 he became the youngest member of the Fania All-Stars. Montalvo’s most recent, Grammy-nominated solo album Desde Nueva York a Puerto Rico proves that this rhythm prodigy still brings it. He returns to Lincoln Center with his band for a night of classic salsa. David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. FREE.

 Saturday, April 21st

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tucker Greenmarket Local farmers sell a wide range of items including: seasonal vegetables, berries, stone fruit, over 80 varieties of apples, farmstead cheeses, fresh seafood, grass fed beef, duck, eggs, baked goods and New York’s only sorghum and maple syrup. West 66th Street and Columbus Avenue.

9 a.m. until 5 p.m. Morningside Park’s Down to Earth Farmer’s Market Local farmers sell a wide range of items including: seasonal vegetables, fruits, plants and flowers, baked goods, fresh fish and seafood, beef, poultry, eggs, cheese, yogurt, honey, pickles and pantry staples such as cornmeal polenta, wheat flour, roasted nuts and dried pasta. Corner of 110th St. & Manhattan Ave.

11 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. Yoga for beginners Isha Yoga for Beginners In this session you will learn simple but powerful yoga postures to balance and stabilize your system . No prior experience with yoga is necesary. Please bring a yoga mat , towel , and arrive on a empty stomach. Free and open to all . Limited to 12 participants. Registration is required. St. Agnes Library, Community Program Room. FREE.

11 a.m. LC Kids Storytime at the Atrium: Hello, Lighthouse! by Sophie Blackall Caldecott Award–winning illustrator Sophie Blackall (Ruby’s Wish, Ivy & Bean) explores the life of one lighthouse through shifting seasons, changeable weather, and the tenure of its final keeper. This relaxed reading, adapted to accommodate young audiences with autism, is part of the Big Umbrella Festival. Ages 2–5. David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. FREE.

11 a.m. Here We Are: Notes for Living on Planet Earth Storytime Filled with gentle humor and insight, Oliver Jeffers’ New York Times bestselling Here We Are is a poignant celebration of life on Earth. Join us for Storytime, with activities to follow. Barnes & Noble, 82nd & Broadway. FREE.

1 p.m. until 2 p.m. Gallery Talk: New Perspectives with Teaching Fellows The gallery tour will focus on the current exhibition. The works in Vestiges and Verse: Notes from the Newfangled Epic show expansive worlds inside the minds of the artists. In many cases, the works do so not through representational pictures but through coded systems and ad hoc languages. This interactive tour will focus on works that are not pictorial representations of the artist’s imagination but are nonetheless visual records of the artist’s creative activities and inner worlds. American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square (Columbus Avenue between 65th and 66th Streets). FREE.

1 p.m. Instant Shakespeare: Celebration in Honor of the 454 Anniversary of his Birth The Instant Shakespeare readings are set up to make Shakespeare accessible. The readings are usually without rehearsal, but they are on-your-feet Instant staged readings where the readers/actors move around as much as they feel comfortable. Readers are encouraged to share with their fellow readers and the audience so that the plays can exist as words and thoughts communicated through space, not just words on the page. St. Agnes Library. FREE.

 Sunday, April 22nd

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Columbia Greenmarket Shoppers will find milk and yogurt, fruit and cider, baked goods, preserved fruits and vegetables, eggs, cheese, smoked meats, pickled vegetables, maple syrup, honey, fish, and focaccia topped with locally sourced fruit vegetables, herbs and cheeses, a lunch time favorite. Located in front of the gates of Columbia University; Broadway between 114th and 116th Streets.

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. 79th Street Greenmarket Located on beautiful, tree-lined Columbus Avenue, this year-round market stretches from 77th St. to 80th St. each Sunday. Just behind the American Museum of Natural History, shoppers will find grass-fed beef, goat cheese, fresh flowers, eggs, honey, baked goods, apple cider, and a large variety of fruit and vegetables. Columbus Avenue between 78th & 81st Streets.

10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Recycle Your E-Waste! Avoid a fine: It’s now illegal to discard electronics in the trash! Learn more here about what items you can drop off. JCC Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Avenue (between 75th & 76th St).

10 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. Grand Bazaar NYC Indoors & outdoors, local artist, designers, and antique/vintage dealers sell one-of-a-kind and limited edition art, antique watches, vintage collectibles and fashion, handmade jewelry and furniture. Delicious artisianal edibles will unsure that you will never leave hungry. 100 West 77th St. (at Columbus Avenue). FREE admission.

11 a.m. Sunday Meeting – Adrian Hyde: Regenerative Agriculture at the Nexus What we eat and how it is grown have profound implications on human health, ecology, animal welfare and local economies. In this discussion, we’ll take a high-level tour through the intersections of agriculture and each of these areas, taking a few dives into the weeds along the way. There will be numerous references for further learning. New York Society for Ethical Culture, 2 West 64th Street (at Central Park West). FREE.

4 p.m. until 8 p.m. Open Mic Night Join in the fun at this UWS jazz venue. With Keith Ingham. Cleopatra’s Needle, 2483-2485 Broadway and 92nd Street. No Cover, $10 Minimum.

5 p.m. until 6 p.m. It’s Sunday: Steven Patchel In celebration of the restored Great Organ, the Cathedral presents a concert series following Sunday Evensong, featuring guest recitalists from around the country. Great Organ: It’s Sunday concerts are held on Sundays at 5 pm in the fall and spring seasons. The Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine, 1047 Amsterdam Avenue (at 112th Street). FREE.