MAN SHOT ON COLUMBUS AVENUE LATE WEDNESDAY

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A 25-year-old man was shot in the shoulder on Wednesday night shortly before 11 p.m., according to scanner traffic and a report on WPIX.

Neighbor Keira Alexander tells us said she heard at least four shots and that a man was taken to the hospital. “Emergency services were on the scene in minutes, NYPD taped-off & scoured the area for 1-2 hours, particularly the community garden on the SE corner of Columbus & 107th, not sure if they found anything. There were quite a lot of people on the scene from the bars and eateries on that strip, Lura, SheShe pizza etc.”

The 24th precinct has not responded to requests for information on the shooting, but we’ll update this if they do.

NEWS | 13 comments | permalink
    1. Gretchen says:

      This is the 3rd shooting on this strip of Columbus Ave. in recent months. First, at an electronics store at 109th & Columbus, then more recently at 104th at a bodega, and now this — a trifecta. The 24th Pct. is not doing enough on this strip which has the Douglass projects on 104th St.

    2. robert says:

      The 24 is actually doing a lot in that area,
      along with other parts of the precinct. Maybe if they could stop more people in known drug/gang locations, like they used to all over the city before our new mayor came in. Back then people didn’t carry as much, as there was a much higher likelihood that they would get caught with it. Only a percentage of the stops came up with a weapon, yes, but a lot more were never carried due to the policy. By they way before you start with the unconstitutional comments. The US Supreme Court held them constitutional in Kelly v Ohio, and they have been upheld several times since then. The mayor and city council can yell all they want but the stops are still legal and will remain so until the Supreme court reverses itself.
      Also the precincts where shooting are now up massively, dovetail exactly, with the precincts that had the largest number of stops and now have seen a huge drop in those stops. Shootings are up 18.2% over last year and murder 12% citywide. In Manhattan North, that’s all the precincts north of 59th street, shootings are up 53.8 % and the number of shooting victims is up 108%.
      Think about it folks

      • Upper West Side Wally says:

        Kelly v Ohio was a freedom of speech issue:
        “[N]o person shall wilfully conduct himself in a noisy, boisterous or other disorderly manner by either words or acts which disturb the good order and quiet of the Municipality.”
        If you want to cite case law, pick the right case, because this case had -nothing- to do with stop-and-frisk.

        • robert says:

          Try Terry v Ohio .1968 It my ne only listed under one or the two to names in some legal references, but there were two defendants that held up a jewelry store

          Terry v. Ohio 392 U.S. 1 (1968)

          This case was the first in a long line of Supreme Court cases that recognized the police practice known as “stop and frisk” as a legitimate law enforcement tool. Stop and frisk is a stopping and interrogation or brief investigation which may be accompanied by the patting down of outer clothing to make sure the suspect is not armed.

          A policemen, suspicious of two men who he suspected were planning a robbery, confronted the men. He asked their names, patted them down and discovered pistols on Terry and his companion. Terry was convicted of carrying a concealed weapon.

          The Supreme Court ruled that, for the protection of an officer, stop and frisk was not a violation of the Fourth Amendment when a police officer’s experience tells him that criminal activity may be occurring and that the suspected crimal may be armed and dangerous.

    3. Tom D says:

      Just wondering if the change in stop and frisk policy has anything to do with increased shootings in this area. Or if this is an increase. This isn’t a blame DeBlasio rant as it seems we may have gone too extreme in the other direction previously.

      • Mike says:

        It probably has nothing to do with the change in stop and frisk. Violent crimes — as a whole — are down city wide, state wide and nationally. This is a continuance of the downward trend which started in the mid-90’s.

      • C says:

        It absolutely does. You can best appreciate this in high-crime areas of the city. Shootings are up by 300% in some sections of the Bronx and Central Brooklyn. Law enforcement will tell you this is entirely due to the limits on stop and frisk. They will also tell you indiviuals are becoming more aggressive in their behavwith the police.

        It is true crime rates have remained low generally, and certainly in Manhattan, and de Blasio and the police certainly deserve credit for that. But crime hasn’t been a problem in Manhattan in years, and probably won’t be, regardless of the changes in stop and frisk.

        But in typically high crime neighborhoods, data suggests shootings are way up. Perhaps this will get worse as the weather warms, as we have had a very cold winter. As always, things like this always impact poor and minority areas disproportionately.

      • Zeus says:

        For the record…
        Crime is down but the murder rate is up 21% since the start of the year 2015.
        These are police records, not mine.
        Stop and frisk never killed anyone.
        Stopping stop and frisk may contribute to someone getting killed.
        Notice I said MAY contribute.

        • John says:

          Google compstat to see just how inherently flawed the system is. If crimes were captured and reported by a 3rd party, you would see an entirely different profile of crime.

          The NYT had a few articles on it. It’s pretty easy to see how the NYPD or any other organization may find creative ways to report their own data, much like every corporation in America.

    4. Gigi says:

      Sad and scary to see my area not 99.9 safe anymore. We barely see/hear of men being shot here. I could go out at 3am for a random walk and feel not much fear but that of a random drunk man in the street, but that’s it. Now, forget about it. Not even putting my shoes out. Something is definitely not right with the system. I doubt things will improve. The 80’s crime era seems to be making a comeback.

    5. robert says:

      Try Terry v Ohio .1968 It my ne only listed under one or the two to names in some legal references, but there were two defendants that held up a jewelry store

      Terry v. Ohio 392 U.S. 1 (1968)

      This case was the first in a long line of Supreme Court cases that recognized the police practice known as “stop and frisk” as a legitimate law enforcement tool. Stop and frisk is a stopping and interrogation or brief investigation which may be accompanied by the patting down of outer clothing to make sure the suspect is not armed.

      A policemen, suspicious of two men who he suspected were planning a robbery, confronted the men. He asked their names, patted them down and discovered pistols on Terry and his companion. Terry was convicted of carrying a concealed weapon.

      The Supreme Court ruled that, for the protection of an officer, stop and frisk was not a violation of the Fourth Amendment when a police officer’s experience tells him that criminal activity may be occurring and that the suspected crimal may be armed and dangerous.