THIS WEEK’S EVENTS

Events for the week beginning February 8, 2016 Check out our list of events in the neighborhood this week. Email us at “info at westsiderag dot com” to tell us about any upcoming events or events we’ve missed. Events will be updated every Sunday night with the following week’s schedule. Please double-check times and prices with the event producer. Many venues offer special pricing for students, seniors and members.

 Monday, February 8

7:30 a.m. until 8:30 a.m. Meditation Gifted meditation instructors lead a session and Q&A in the beautiful Makom space. JCC in Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Avenue. FREE for all;  suggested donation of $5.

11 a.m. until 12:15 p.m. NAAM YOGA Therapies Community Class NAAM YOGA Therapies Community Class on Healing Cognitive Diseases (including the initial stages of Alzheimer’s disease) Benefits of learning this valuable practice for you and to share with your loved ones include: increase in cognitive reasoning, increase in balance & coordination, relation of muscles, sleep better and more! Naam Yoga New York, 141 West 72nd Street #1. FREE, but donations accepted.

6 p.m. David Gordon’s Dancing Henry Five A screening of the 2011 performance of David Gordon’s Dancing Henry Five, based on Henry V by William Shakespeare. New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Bruno Walter Auditorium. FREE.

7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. Columbus: Themes in Literature Book Club Join the Themes in Literature Book Club for a discussion on The Price of Salt by Patricia Highsmith. This is the third installation in the club’s series on “books adapted for movies” (​Dec 14: ​ Harper Lee: To Kill a Mockingbird; ​Jan 11: ​ Graham Green: Brighton Rock). The Themes in Literature Book Club meets every month in 3-month theme cycles. Three works of literature that share a common theme are read and discussed — one novel with its own conversation each month. At least one classic and one contemporary novel are included in each theme’s book selection. If you have questions or would like to join the book club, email themesinliterature@bookculture.com. Book Culture, 450 Columbus Avenue (between 81st & 82nd Streets). FREE.

7:30 p.m. LC Originals: First Look Some of Broadway’s top talent including Will Swenson, Jessica Phillips, Jenni Barber, and Andrew Mueller perform songs from Some Lovers, the new musical from legendary songwriter Burt Bacharach and Tony Award–winning playwright Steven Sater (Spring Awakening). David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. FREE.

8 p.m. Film Screening: Trigger: The Ripple Effects of Gun Violence Whenever an act of gun violence occurs, communities are fractured at every level. This is what makes Trigger such a powerfully moving film. It shares the stories of individuals that encounter gun violence in various sectors of our communities: parents, children and siblings of victims, school teachers, trauma surgeons, law enforcement, legislators, pastors and grief counselors. Although we often think of a bullet as being an end, for those affected, it is only the beginning. A discussion following will include an update from Metro New York IAF’s policy initiatives for Gun Safety. West Park Presbyterian Church, 165 West 86th Street. $10 requested donation.

 Tuesday, February 9

12 p.m. Gotham Jazzmen Jazz concert presented by the Gotham Jazzmen. Please enter by 111 Amsterdam Avenue. Doors open at 11:45 a.m. Plaza entrance opens at 12:00 p.m. New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Bruno Walter Auditorium. FREE.

5:45 p.m. until 6:45 p.m. Meditation Gifted meditation instructors lead a session and Q&A in the beautiful Makom space. JCC in Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Avenue. FREE for all;  suggested donation of $5.

6:30 p.m. Urban Art Legends: A Conversation and Book Launch with DAZE, Alan KET & Nick Walker In just forty years, what was once viewed as mindless vandalism – graffiti – has grown into a highly valued, socially relevant urban art form found in galleries and museums around the world—as well as on walls and trains. Join renowned graffiti artists Alan KET, Nick Walker, and DAZE, the star of our exhibition, Chris “Daze” Ellis: The City is My Muse, to discuss KET’s new book, Urban Art Legends, which explores the pioneering urban artists that have driven graffiti’s shift from underground into the mainstream. They will consider the contentious position of graffiti as an art form and explore their choices to challenge classical ideas of art through this uniquely urban medium. Museum of the City of New York, 1220 5th Avenue at 103rd Street. Use the code DIST6 for discount tickets.

7 p.m. Sari Wilson’s Girl Through Glass: A Novel Sari Wilson’s literary debut tells the story of a young girl’s coming-of-age in the cutthroat world of New York City ballet. Eleven-year-old Mira finds escape in dance. It offers her control, power, and the promise of glory … and introduces her to 47-year-old Maurice DuPont, a reclusive, charismatic balletomane. Decades later, dramas of a past she thought forgotten will change her life forever. Barnes & Noble, 2289 Broadway (at 82nd Street). FREE.

7 p.m. Community Board 7 Transportation Committee Meeting At 250 West 87th street.

7 p.m. Columbus: Aidan Donnelley Rowley on The Ramblers Set in the most magical parts of Manhattan—the Upper West Side, Central Park, Greenwich Village—The Ramblers explores the lives of three lost souls, bound together by friendship and family. During the course of one fateful Thanksgiving week, Rowley’s sharply defined characters explore the moments when decisions are deliberately made, choices accepted, and pasts reconciled. The Ramblers is a love letter to New York City—an accomplished, sumptuous novel about fate, loss, hope, birds, friendship, love, the wonders of the natural world and the mysteries of the human spirit. Book Culture, 450 Columbus Avenue (between 81st & 82nd Streets). FREE.

7:30 p.m. LC Originals: Songwriters Karey and Wayne Kirkpatrick, the creators of the Broadway smash Something Rotten!, head a list of top musical theater songwriters premiering songs inspired by Lincoln Center. David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. FREE.

 Wednesday, February 10

12 p.m. until 1 p.m. Mid-Day Music @ Columbia featuring Nansong Huang (piano) Come join us in the Garden Room at Faculty House, where Students and Music Associates from Columbia University’s Music Performance Program will be showcased in a noontime recital series. This public event is sponsored by Columbia University’s Music Performance Program. Faculty House, Garden Room 2, 64 Morningside Drive. FREE.

1 p.m. until 5 p.m. St. Agnes Library Branch Book and Multimedia Sale For a selection of paperback, hard-cover books, CD’s, DVD’s and much more, check out this midweek sale. Most selections from $2 or less. St. Agnes Library, 444 Amsterdam Avenue (between 81st & 82nd Streets).

2 p.m. until 3 p.m.  Jazz+Wednesdays Join jazz trio Bill Wurtzel, Jay Leonhart, and Sharon Fisher for music celebrating the ideals of fellowship, labor, charity, passage, and wisdom, themes in Mystery and Benevolence: Masonic and Odd Fellows Folk Art from the Kendra and Allan Daniel Collection. American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square, Columbus Avenue (at 66th Street). FREE.

6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The W Connection Widows Helping Widows Rebuild Their Lives UWS Chapter Meeting  Join us to discuss topics and issues to help widows rebuild their lives after the loss of a spouse.  These groups are for widows and run by widows.  Please RSVP to dawn@wconnection.org if you are interested in attending a trial meeting on UWS.  Membership in The W Connection is $40 annually which gives you access to our programs and services.

7 p.m. A.O. Scott’s Better Living Through Criticism: How to Think about Art, Pleasure, Beauty, and Truth New York Times film critic A.O. Scott argues why we need criticism now more than ever. He suggests we are, in fact, all critics. While individual critics – himself included – can make mistakes and find flaws where they shouldn’t, criticism as a discipline is one of the noblest, most creative, and urgent activities of modern existence. Barnes & Noble, 2289 Broadway (at 82nd Street). FREE.

7 p.m. Community Board 7 Business Committee Meeting Liquor licenses, sidewalk cafes and more. At 250 West 87th street.

7 p.m. Columbus: Muriel Barbery on The Life of Elves Barbery’s The Life of Elves tells the story of two children whose extraordinary talents will bring them into contact with magical worlds and malevolent forces. If, against all odds, they can be brought together, their meeting may shape the course of history. With its cast of unforgettable characters, each fighting to preserve a sense of enchantment, The Life of Elves is a poetic meditation on art, nature, dreams, and the role of the imagination.

7 p.m. until 11 p.m. Open Mic Night Join in the fun at this UWS jazz venue. With Les Kurtz Trio. Cleopatra’s Needle, 2483-2485 Broadway and 92nd Street. No Cover, $10 Minimum.

7:30 p.m. Insights at the Atrium — “Stepping Inside Mahler’s Sixth” Using Philharmonic recordings of Mahler’s Sixth Symphony led by Mitropoulos, Bernstein, Maazel, and Alan Gilbert and marked conducting scores from the New York Philharmonic Leon Levy Digital Archives, Professor Alex Ruthmann and his team from the New York University Music Experience Design Lab have developed a prototype that allows listeners to explore the score and understand what distinguishes each performance. Interactive stations will be available to “test drive” the prototype at this media-rich event featuring speakers on the historic relationship of Mahler’s Sixth Symphony with the Philharmonic, and the new prototype that has taken material from theLeon Levy Digital Archives in a new direction. David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. FREE.

7:30 p.m. 112th: The Essays Book Club discusses “Strangers Drowning” What does it mean to devote yourself wholly to helping others? In “Strangers Drowning,” The New Yorker staff writer Larissa MacFarquhar seeks out people living lives of extreme ethical commitment and tells their deeply intimate stories; their stubborn integrity and their compromises; their bravery and their recklessness; their joys and defeats and wrenching dilemmas. The Essays Book Club meets on the second Wednesday of every month to discuss a collection of essays. Though the essay is a famously ancient form, this book club will focus largely on more contemporary essays. The collections read will be by a variety of writers—men and women, experimental and traditional authors, from America and abroad—and address a wide range of topics. Discussions will focus on both the subject matter of the books and the techniques employed by their authors. If you have questions or would like to join the book club, please email ryan@bookculture.com. Book Culture, 536 W. 112th Street (between Amsterdam & Broadway). FREE.

9 p.m. until 12 a.m. Syncopated City Swing Social Dance Join us Wednesday nights for the Syncopated Social! Each week’s DJ will play all the classic swing jazz and social favorites for a dance rife with inspiration, fun and surprises! Utilizing the open space at West Park Presbyterian Church on the Upper West Side, this will be a great night to dance and socialize. West Park Presbyterian Church, 165 West 86th Street. $6 ($4 for swing class students).

Thursday, February 11

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tucker Greenmarket Local farmers sell a wide range of items including: seasonal vegetables, berries, stone fruit, over 80 varieties of apples, farmstead cheeses, fresh seafood, grass fed beef, duck, eggs, baked goods and New York’s only sorghum and maple syrup. West 66th Street and Columbus Avenue.

9 a.m Montclare Children’s School Dr. Marcie offers an interactive Parenting Workshop/Q & A offering practical behavior tools. Participants will immediately be able to implement this toolkit at home.  Dr. Marcie has over 15 years of experience as a behavior specialist with a focus on challenging behavior.  Dr. Marcie is a frequent contributor to NBC Parenting Toolkit and has a column in NY Parenting. RSVP todtandet@montclareschool.org – Space is limited. Montclare Children’s School, 747 Amsterdam Avenue (between 96th & 97th Street). FREE.

1 p.m. until 2 p.m. Curator’s Perspective Tour Join Stacy C. Hollander, Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs, Chief Curator, and Director of Exhibitions, for a tour of Mystery and Benevolence: Masonic and Odd Fellows Folk Art from the Kendra and Allan Daniel Collection. American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square, Columbus Avenue (at 66th Street). FREE.

6 p.m. Shakespeare, Love and Spring Songs of Women in love, Doomed love and Universal love, featuring: Zelia Chueke (piano) and Sophia Chueke (mezzo-soprano). New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Bruno Walter Auditorium. FREE.

6:30 p.m. Community Board 7 Preservation Committee Meeting At 250 West 87th street.

7 p.m. until 11 p.m. Kazu Trio With Kazu Pf (piano), Norbert Farkas (bass) and Jacob Melchior (drums) Cleopatra’s Needle, 2483-2485 Broadway and 92nd Street. No Cover, $10 Minimum.

7:30 p.m. Dover Quartet This event is part of the Great Performers Complimentary Classical series, a special set of free concerts that spotlight some of the brightest rising string quartets. David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. FREE.

8 p.m. until Midnight Israeli Dance Join us every Thursday night for an evening filled with dancing and fun. Enjoy the relaxed and inviting atmosphere. Open to all levels. JCC Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Avenue (at 76th Street). $10.

Friday, February 12

2016 Charles Mingus High School Competition and Festival at Manhattan School of Music and Jazz Standard from Friday, February 12, 2016 to Monday, February 15, 2016Master Classes, workshops, and jam sessions culminating in the competition. Pricing ranges from FREE to $30.

8 a.m. until 2 p.m. 97th Street Greenmarket This year-round market features produce from southern New Jersey, Orange County, NY, and the Hudson Valley, as well as eggs, grass-fed meat, fish, cheese, and more. 97th St between Columbus & Amsterdam.REE.

5:30 p.m. Free Music Fridays Music featured at the Free Music Fridays series thematically reflects the spirit of the self-taught art on view at the museum. This winter and spring during the run of Mystery and Benevolence: Masonic and Odd Fellows Folk Art from the Kendra and Allan Daniel Collection, discover fraternal art and enjoy live acoustic performances by acclaimed musicians. Support the proceedings with a donation-based cash wine bar. This week’s performances include: Those Sensible Shoes (Acoustic indie folk); 6:05 pm: Matt Keating (Acoustic folk rock); 6:40 pm: Rodrigo Aranjuelo (Acoustic contemporary folk singer/songwriter). American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square, Columbus Avenue (at 66th Street). FREE.

6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Superheroes in Gotham Superheroes in Gotham will tell the story of the birth of comic book superheroes in New York City; the leap of comic book superheroes from the page into radio, television, and film; the role of fandom, including the yearly mega event known as New York Comic Con; and the ways in which comic book superheroes, created in the late 1930s through the 1960s, have inspired and influenced the work of contemporary comic book artists, cartoonists, and painters in New York City. New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street). Admission is pay-as-you-wish.

7 p.m. Bernard and Irene Schwartz Classic Film Series Presents: Glory (1989) Join us for the New-York Historical Society’s film series, featuring opening remarks by notable directors, writers, actors, and historians. This series explores how film has tackled social conflict, morality, and the perennial struggles between right and wrong that are waged from the highest levels of government to the smallest local communities. This week’s feature screening is Glory, the Civil War epic that follows the first all-black regiment as they fight for racial equality among their fellow Union Army officers as well as against the Confederates. Directed by Edward Zwick. Starring Matthew Broderick, Denzel Washington, Morgan Freeman. 122 min. The Robert H. Smith Auditorium, The New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West. Admission is pay-as-you-wish.

8 p.m. until 10 p.m. New Amsterdam Symphony Orchestra The New Amsterdam Symphony Orchestra presents Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 1, a work begun 100 years ago in the style of Haydn and subtitled “Classical”; Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7, considered by many to be his best orchestral composition; and Prokofiev’s Violin Concerto No. 2. The multi-talented Nico Olarte-Hayes conducts, and Michelle Ross is the solo violinist. Symphony Space, 2547 Broadway (95th Street). $25; Members, Seniors, Students $18; Children $15.

10 p.m. Late Night Salon with Alan Gilbert The night isn’t over yet! Grab a drink and wind down with the New York Philharmonic’s Music Director and his friends—who happen to be world-class performers. David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. FREE.

 Saturday, February 13

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tucker Greenmarket Local farmers sell a wide range of items including: seasonal vegetables, berries, stone fruit, over 80 varieties of apples, farmstead cheeses, fresh seafood, grass fed beef, duck, eggs, baked goods and New York’s only sorghum and maple syrup. West 66th Street and Columbus Avenue.

11 a.m. until 12 p.m. New York City Ballet Family Saturdays: “Choreographic Voices” A perfect introduction for children ages five and up to the classical world of dance. David H. Koch Theater. A limited amount of discounted tickets of $5 (normally $22) are available. Call 212-870-5636 or email education@nyballet.com.

11 a.m. Love Monster and the Last Chocolate Storytime Monster comes home from vacation and discovers a box of chocolates on his doorstep. He knows he should share it with his friends, but what if there’s none left for him after everyone has a piece? Activities and coloring to follow Storytime. Barnes & Noble, 2289 Broadway (at 82nd Street). FREE.

1 p.m. until 2 p.m. Closer-Look Tour Please join for a tour of the exhibition Mystery and Benevolence: Masonic and Odd Fellows Folk Art from the Kendra and Allan Daniel Collection led by the museum’s gallery guides.
Meet in the museum atrium. American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square, Columbus Avenue (at 66th Street). FREE.

2 p.m. Saturday Afternoon Movie: Labyrinth The film centers upon teenage Sarah (Jennifer Connelly), who lives in a fantasy world of myth and magic, evil spells, and wondrous enchantment. She is baby-sitting her little brother when she cavalierly wishes that goblins would take him away. She gets her wish, and a coterie of goblins abduct him. She then encounters Jareth (David Bowie), the ruler of a mystical world one step removed from reality. He tells Sarah that the only way to get her brother back is to find her way through a M.C. Escher-like labyrinth and find the castle at the center. As she makes her way through the maze, she faces a number of horrific challenges before she finds her way to the gravity-defying castle, where her brother is being held by the evil goblins. PG 101mins. St. Agnes Library, 444 Amsterdam Avenue (between 81st & 82nd Streets). FREE.

3 p.m. Central Park Ice Festival On Valentine’s Day weekend, celebrate your love of Central Park’s sculptures at our fifth annual free Ice Festival. Witness ice-carving artists from Okamoto Studio  use electric chain saws, chisels, and picks to transform more than 6,000 pounds of ice into a glistening replica of one of the Park’s most beloved statues.  As night falls, revel among colorful lights as the Mall becomes a vibrant silent disco with live DJs, all to celebrate Central Park Conservancy’s preservation efforts. Naumberg Bandshell. FREE.

 Sunday, February 14

8:00 a.m. until 5 p.m. Columbia Greenmarket Shoppers will find milk and yogurt, fruit and cider, baked goods, preserved fruits and vegetables, eggs, cheese, smoked meats, pickled vegetables, maple syrup, honey, fish, and focaccia topped with locally sourced fruit vegetables, herbs and cheeses, a lunch time favorite. Located in front of the gates of Columbia University; Broadway between 114th and 116th Streets.

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. 79th Street Greenmarket Located on beautiful, tree-lined Columbus Avenue, this year-round market stretches from 77th St. to 80th St. each Sunday. Just behind the American Museum of Natural History, shoppers will find grass-fed beef, goat cheese, fresh flowers, eggs, honey, baked goods, apple cider, and a large variety of fruit and vegetables. Columbus Avenue between 78th & 81st Streets.

10 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. GreenFlea Market Operating for more than 25 years, GreenFlea was among the first open air markets in the city. Combining both antique/vintage collectibles and new handcrafted items, it is an ideal place to look for something different to give or to keep. In the playground on 77th Street and Columbus.

11 a.m. Sunday Meeting -The Farthest Reaches of American Racism With the coming of Barack Obama, and even several years before, we had reason to believe that at long last America was beginning to put its abominable legacy of racism behind us. After all, such values as “tolerance” and “multiculturalism” were coursing through large segments of American society. But the recent spate of killings of young black men killed by white police officer with impunity, has dramatically  revealed that such optimism was premature. So has increased exposure of the astounding rates of incarceration of black men, and much else. How are we to explain the sheer persistence and endurance of racism that continues to deeply permeate our society? New York Society For Ethical Culture, 2 West 64th Street. FREE.

4 p.m. until 8 p.m. Open Mic Night Join in the fun at this UWS jazz venue. With Keith Ingham. Cleopatra’s Needle, 2483-2485 Broadway and 92nd Street. No Cover, $10 Minimum.