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THIS WEEK’S EVENTS

Events for the week beginning February 20, 2016 Check out our list of events in the neighborhood this week. Email us at “info at westsiderag dot com” to tell us about any upcoming events or events we’ve missed. Events will be updated every Sunday night with the following week’s schedule. Please double-check times and prices with the event producer. Many venues offer special pricing for students, seniors and members.

 Monday, February 20

10 a.m. until 4 p.m. The Lasker Rink converts from a swimming pool in the summer to an ice-skating rink during the winter months. It hosts skating, adult and youth hockey, lessons for all ages and abilities, skate rentals, and lockers. See public session hours hereLasker Rink (between 106th and 108th Streets). Enter the Park at 110th and Lenox Avenue. $8 Adults; $4 Youths; $2.25 Seniors. $7 Skate Rentals.

1 p.m. until 1;30 p.m. Great Organ: Midday Monday Cathedral organists provide a 30-minute break for mind, body and spirit on Mondays at 1 pm with an entertaining and informative demonstration of the Cathedral’s unparalleled Great Organ. The Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine, 1047 Amsterdam Avenue (at 112th Street).

5:45 p.m. until 6:45 p.m. Meditation Gifted meditation instructors lead a session and Q&A in the beautiful Makom space. JCC in Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Avenue. FREE for all;  $5 suggested donation.

7: 30 p.m. Artists-in-Residence Windscape. Greenfield Hall, Manhattan School of Music (122nd & Broadway). FREE.

 Tuesday, February 21

7:30 a.m. until 8:30 a.m. Meditation Gifted meditation instructors lead a session and Q&A in the beautiful Makom space. JCC in Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Avenue. FREE for all;  $5 suggested donation.

5 p.m. Meditation: Blast Open Your Heart Get ready to experience expansion and unconditional love. This meditation is an amazing healing tool for loneliness, breakups, depression. This program will be led by Elena Zelenina. St. Agnes Library. FREE.

6 p.m. Location, Location, Location: Barnard’s Belated Embrace of Its Urban Identity Barnard has always been, as Columbia University’s full title has it, “in the City of New York,” but has it always been “of the City of New York”? Professor of history Robert McCaughey says that for much of its first 90 years Barnard resisted the urban essence of its identity, preferring instead to identify with the “country college” sylvan ideal of the other Seven Sisters. Only in the last four decades has the College fully embraced the gritty and energizing implications of its urban setting. How did this change of attitude help Barnard grow into the institution we know today? And what took it so long? Join Professor McCaughey for a fascinating look at the evolution of our beloved school. The first in a series of conversations preceding Professor McCaughey’s book on Barnard’s history. Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd Fl, Barnard Hall (Broadway & 117th St) FREE.

7 p.m. Columbus: “The Skin Above My Knee” by Marcia Butler Please join us for the launch of Marcia Butler’s The Skin Above My Knee, the unflinching story of a professional oboist who finds order and beauty in music as her personal life threatens to destroy her. Book Culture, 450 Columbus Avenue (between 81st & 82nd Streets). FREE.

7 p.m. Christina Baker Kline in conversation with John Searles Christina Baker Kline weaves fact and fiction into a powerful new novel A Piece of the World illuminating a little-known part of history. To Christina Olson, the entire world was her family’s remote farm. She seemed destined for a small life. Instead, for decades, she was host and inspiration for Andrew Wyeth and became the subject of one of the best known paintings of the twentieth century. 82nd & Broadway, 2289 Broadway. FREE.

7 p.m. 112th: Reinhold Martin on “The Urban Apparatus” Join us for a discussion of The Urban Apparatus: Mediapolitics and the City by Reinhold Martin. Joining him in conversation is Andreas Huyssen, author of Miniature Metropolis: Literature in an Age of Photography and Film. The Urban Apparatus serves as an urban bookend to the architectural questions explored by Martin in his earlier book Utopia’s Ghost, and ultimately offers readers a way to think politically about urbanization. Book Culture, 536 W 112th Street (between Amsterdam & Broadway). FREE.

 Wednesday, February 22

2 p.m. until 3 p.m. Jazz+Wednesdays During the run of the exhibition Securing the Shadow: Posthumous Portraiture in America, the Bill Wurtzel trio will perform music that celebrates remembrance and life. American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square (Columbus Avenue between 65th and 66th Streets). FREE.

5 p.m. until 7 p.m. Wednesday Social Wednesday Social is the museum’s new weekly event, Wednesdays from 5–7 PM. Stop in for a glass of wine, docent-led highlights of the exhibition Securing the Shadow, and a browse through the Museum Shop. American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square (Columbus Avenue between 65th and 66th Streets). FREE.

6 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. The W Connection Widows Helping Widows Rebuild Their Lives UWS Chapter Meeting Join us to discuss topics and issues to help widows rebuild their lives after the loss of a spouse.  These groups are for widows and run by widows.  Please RSVP to dawn@wconnection.org if you are interested in attending a complimentary trial meeting on UWS.  If you would like to join after your trial meeting, membership in The W Connection is $40 annually which gives you access to all our chapter and programs.

7 p.m. until 11 p.m. Open Mic Night Join in the fun at this UWS jazz venue. With Les Kurtz Trio. Cleopatra’s Needle, 2483-2485 Broadway and 92nd Street. No Cover, $10 Minimum. 

7 p.m. 112th: The “Punk Ethnography” Please join us for a discussion of the Punk Ethnography, a ground-breaking case study that examines record production as ethnographic work.  Situated at the intersection of ethnomusicology, sound studies, cultural anthropology, and popular music studies, the essays in this volume explore the issues surrounding the label including appropriation and intellectual property while providing critical commentary and charting the impact of the label through listener interviews. Book Culture, 536 W 112th Street (between Amsterdam & Broadway). FREE.

7 p.m. Bill Hayes in Conversation With Bill Goldstein Bill Hayes came to New York with only the vaguest idea of how he would get by. Grieving over the death of his partner, he quickly discovered the profound consolations of the city’s rhythms. And he unexpectedly fell in love again, with his friend and neighbor, the writer and neurologist Oliver Sacks. Insomniac City: New York, Oliver, and Me is both a meditation on grief and a celebration of life. 82nd & Broadway, 2289 Broadway. FREE.

7:30 p.m. MSM Chamber Sinfonia Conducted by Jane Glover. Presented by Manhattan School of Music. Neidorff-Karpati Hall, Manhattan School of Music (122nd & Broadway). FREE.

Thursday, February 23

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tucker Greenmarket Local farmers sell a wide range of items including: seasonal vegetables, berries, stone fruit, over 80 varieties of apples, farmstead cheeses, fresh seafood, grass fed beef, duck, eggs, baked goods and New York’s only sorghum and maple syrup. West 66th Street and Columbus Avenue.

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Columbia Greenmarket Shoppers will find milk and yogurt, fruit and cider, baked goods, preserved fruits and vegetables, eggs, cheese, smoked meats, pickled vegetables, maple syrup, honey, fish, and focaccia topped with locally sourced fruit vegetables, herbs and cheeses, a lunch time favorite. Located in front of the gates of Columbia University; Broadway between 114th and 116th Streets.

1 p.m. until 2 p.m. Closer-Look Tour A tour of Securing the Shadow: Posthumous Portraiture in America led by museum gallery guides. American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square (Columbus Avenue between 65th and 66th Streets). FREE.

3:30 p.m. Wildlife at the Library Join Andrew Simmons and his traveling zoo as he introduces you to a golden eagle, eagle owl, barn owl, burmese python, black throat monitor, alligator, and opossums. Learn about the fierce competitors in the wild. For ages 13 to 18 years old. St. Agnes Library. FREE.

6 p.m. The Other One Percent – New Reading and Discussion Group The Calhoun School will join the Barnard Library to offer The Other One Percent, a winter-spring reading and discussion group exploring topics around punishment and the prison industrial complex, hosted by the St. Agnes Branch of The New York Public Library (NYPL). Members of the Calhoun community and the New York City community generally are invited to participate. The seminar explores a variety of theories around punishment, institutions and instruments of punishment, histories of incarceration in the modern era, experiences of formerly incarcerated persons, and reform debates and dilemmas. St. Agnes Library. FREE.

7 p.m. 112th: Matthew Jones on “Reckoning with Matter” In Reckoning with Matter, Matthew L. Jones draws on the remarkably extensive and well-preserved records of the quest to explore the concrete processes involved in imagining, elaborating, testing, and building calculating machines. Jones argues that the conceptions of creativity and making they exhibited are often more incisive and more honest than those that dominate our current legal, political, and aesthetic culture. Book Culture, 536 W 112th Street (between Amsterdam & Broadway). FREE.

7 p.m. Columbus: Mary Cappello on “Life Breaks In” Please join us for a reading and discussion with Mary Cappello, author of the new book Life Breaks in: A Mood Almanack. Joining her will be writers Elaine Sexton, Kristin Prevallet, and Dawn Raffel. Mary Cappello explores mood in all its manifestations: how it works in and with us as complicated, imperfectly self-knowing beings existing in a world that impinges and infringes on us, but also regularly suffuses us with beauty and joy and wonder. Book Culture, 450 Columbus Avenue (between 81st & 82nd Streets). FREE.

7 p.m. Damion Searls’ The Inkblots: Hermann Rorschach, His Iconic Test, and the Power of Seeing Damion Searls draws on unpublished letters and diaries as well as previously unknown interviews with Rorschach’s family, friends and colleagues to tell the unlikely story of the test’s creation, its controversial reinvention and its remarkable endurance–and what it all reveals about the power of perception. He will be in conversation with Olga Khazan, health and gender writer for The Atlantic. 82nd & Broadway, 2289 Broadway. FREE.

7:30 p.m. Catalyst Quartet Enjoy an evening of chamber music with this “invariably energetic and finely burnished” young ensemble (New York Times). Bach (arr. Catalyst Quartet): Goldberg Variations, for string quartet. Connect to the Facebook event page for extra insights on this program. David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. FREE.

Friday, February 24

8 a.m. until 2 p.m. 97th Street Greenmarket This year-round market features produce from southern New Jersey, Orange County, NY, and the Hudson Valley, as well as eggs, grass-fed meat, fish, cheese, and more. 97th St between Columbus & Amsterdam. FREE.

11:15 a.m. until 12:15 p.m. Stay Well Exercise for Seniors Stay Well volunteers are certified by the NYC’s Department for the aging will lead participants in a well-balanced series of exercises for seniors of all ability levels. Exercise equipment will be provided. St. Agnes Library. FREE.

5:30 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. Free Music Fridays Music featured at the Free Music Fridays series thematically reflects the spirit of the self-taught art on view at the museum. Performances by: Kasey Williams (Indie folk-pop); 6:05 pm: Andi Rae Healy (Indie country); 6:40 pm: Terry Radigan (Alt-country folk). American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square (Columbus Avenue between 65th and 66th Streets). FREE.

7 p.m. Comedy Corner at Ethical: John Marshall Laughter is the best medicine. MC Scott Blakeman of Laughing Liberally brings you an ample dose, with the hottest comedians on the New York stage. Joining Scott this month is the Emmy-nominated late night TV comedy writer (Politically Incorrect, The Chris Rock Show, and others) and comedian, John Marshall. John is most recently the author of The Greenfeather. Loosely based on The Godfather, Marshall’s debut novel is a hilarious romp in which he satirizes crime, families, crime families, and–would you believe it–the environmental movement. Come and hear all about it. New York Society For Ethical Culture, 2 West 64th Street. Suggested donation: Members $5, Nonmembers $10.

6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Tattooed New York An exciting exhibition where history and pop culture converge to tell the complex story of a fascinating art form in America’s cultural nucleus. New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West (at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street). Pay-as-you-wish.

6 p.m. Shabbat After Dark for 20s and 30s Meet other young Jewish professionals at these energetic Shabbat services featuring our full band. After services, join us for drinks, casual conversation, and the sweet taste of Insomnia Cookies. RSVP hereStephen Wise Free Synagogue, 30 West 68th Street (between Columbus Ave. and Central Park West), Free

7:30 p.m. Pedrito Martinez Group This edition of the Atrium’s Friday night Latin dance party will be led by Grammy-nominated percussionist, singer, and songwriter Pedrito Martinez. With fans that include Eric Clapton, Derek Trucks, Wynton Marsalis, Ruben Blades, and Quincy Jones, the world-class rumbero and his band have been “writing a new chapter in Cuban music history” (NPR) since they started playing together in 2005. Tonight they invite you to the dance floor with their fresh takes on the Afro-Cuban traditions of rumba and Yoruba, performing music off their most recent album, Habana Dreams. Opening set by DJ Carlos. Connect to the Facebook event page for extra insights on this program.  David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. FREE.

8 p.m. An Evening with Brenda Patterson ’00 In this program, Barnard/Juilliard graduate and Metropolitan Opera singer Brenda Patterson, an “out” mezzo-soprano, invites the listener to experience the power and intimacy of art song when it is offered without emotional translation. Using Schumann’s classic song cycle, “A Woman’s Love & Life,” set with new texts by contemporary lesbian poet Emily Moore, Patterson at once effaces and revivifies Schumann’s original masterpiece, reclaiming it as a modern, fully inhabitable work that speaks to our contemporary realities. This cycle will juxtapose against selections from Hector Berlioz and American songwriter Ricky Ian Gordon to explore related themes of intimacy and loss, from poet Théophile Gautier’s romanticized 19th Century “love that dare not speak its name” to the AIDS crisis of the 1990s. Renate Rohlfing will provide accompaniment on the piano. Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd Fl, Barnard Hall (Broadway & 117th St) FREE.

 Saturday, February 25

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tucker Greenmarket Local farmers sell a wide range of items including: seasonal vegetables, berries, stone fruit, over 80 varieties of apples, farmstead cheeses, fresh seafood, grass fed beef, duck, eggs, baked goods and New York’s only sorghum and maple syrup. West 66th Street and Columbus Avenue.

9 a.m. until 5 p.m. Morningside Park’s Down to Earth Farmer’s Market Local farmers sell a wide range of items including: seasonal vegetables, fruits, plants and flowers, baked goods, fresh fish and seafood, beef, poultry, eggs, cheese, yogurt, honey, pickles and pantry staples such as cornmeal polenta, wheat flour, roasted nuts and dried pasta. Corner of 110th St. & Manhattan Ave.

11 a.m. Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss! Storytime In celebration of the beloved author’s birthday on March 2nd, we will host a special Storytime featuring coloring, activities and more. 82nd & Broadway, 2289 Broadway. FREE.

12 p.m. The LEGO Batman Movie Event We continue our three-month series of events celebrating The LEGO Batman Movie. Kids will be called to put their detective skills to the test with themed activities as well as make & play moments with LEGO bricks/blocks. At each event, kids can collect two limited-edition trading cards (while supplies last) featuring characters from the movie. Join us again on March 11th for the final event. At Barnes and Noble on 82nd.

1 p.m. Israel’s Challenges and Opportunities in a Changing Global Order Shaare Zedek welcomes Gabriel Mitchell, the U.S. representative from Mitvim, the Israeli Institute for Regional Foreign Policies. Change is a constant in history, and recent geopolitical developments — both in the Middle East and on the international stage — will demand that countries adopt creative strategies in order to navigate a secure route through uncertain times. Join Mr. Mitchell for a conversation about the challenges and opportunities that Israel faces, and how the arrival of a new U.S. administration will impact the US-Israel bond. Prior to the talk, we welcome visitors to join us for traditional, egalitarian services beginning at 9:30 AM, including children’s services at 11:00 AM and a lunch afterwards. Donations for lunch are welcome. Congregation Shaare Zedek, 212 W. 93rd Street. FREE.

2 p.m. Saturday Afternoon Movie: The Manchurian Candidate An unusually tense and intelligent political thriller, The Manchurian Candidate was a film far ahead of its time. Its themes of thought control, political assassination, and multinational conspiracy were hardly common currency in 1962, and while its outlook is sometimes informed by Cold War paranoia, the film seemed nearly as timely when it was reissued in 1987 as it did on its original release. St. Agnes Library. FREE.

 Sunday, February 26

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Columbia Greenmarket Shoppers will find milk and yogurt, fruit and cider, baked goods, preserved fruits and vegetables, eggs, cheese, smoked meats, pickled vegetables, maple syrup, honey, fish, and focaccia topped with locally sourced fruit vegetables, herbs and cheeses, a lunch time favorite. Located in front of the gates of Columbia University; Broadway between 114th and 116th Streets.

8 a.m. until 5 p.m. 79th Street Greenmarket Located on beautiful, tree-lined Columbus Avenue, this year-round market stretches from 77th St. to 80th St. each Sunday. Just behind the American Museum of Natural History, shoppers will find grass-fed beef, goat cheese, fresh flowers, eggs, honey, baked goods, apple cider, and a large variety of fruit and vegetables. Columbus Avenue between 78th & 81st Streets.

11 a.m. Sunday Meeting: American Indian Community House Stands with Standing Rock Members from the American Indian Community House were at Standing Rock and stayed at the Oceti Sakowin Two Spirit and Red Warrior Camps. A.I.C.H. stands in solidarity with hundreds of tribes from all over the world who have gathered there to protect the sacred waters. It is with the utmost gratitude to those who have supported and continue to support these efforts. Sheldon will share important updates and report out from Standing Rock and the current state of it. New York Society For Ethical Culture, 2 West 64th Street. FREE.

12 p.m. until 12:45 p.m. Kids Irish Step Dance with McManus Irish dance (ages 4 & up) This class is for dancers who are any level from brand new thru having some basic steps in Irish dance. Dancers will be able to recognize Irish dance tunes and execute basic Irish dance movements such as skip 2-3s, sevens, back 2-3s, jump 2-3s, and jig movements. Must RSVP: McManusIrishDance@gmail.comRipley Grier studios, 131 west 72 street (between Columbus & Amsterdam Aves). FREE trial for all first time dancers.

12:45 until 1:30 p.m. Jiggy Tots Pre-Irish Dance and Movement for Toddlers (Ages 2-4) with a Participating Adult Upbeat traditional Irish music and song, combined with popular toddler songs, clapping, stamping and shakers are also used to explore rhythm and a variety of time signatures– dancing & movement activities that work on coordination and gross motor skills. Must RSVP: McManusIrishDance@gmail.com Ripley Grier studios, 131 west 72 street (between Columbus & Amsterdam Aves). FREE trial for all first time dancers.

4 p.m. until 8 p.m. Open Mic Night Join in the fun at this UWS jazz venue. With Keith Ingham. Cleopatra’s Needle, 2483-2485 Broadway and 92nd Street. No Cover, $10 Minimum.